AdWords Impression Share Changes

How many times are your Exact match keywords triggering an ad instead of a Broad or Phrase? How many Impressions are you losing because your daily budget ran out early or your bids/quality score weren’t high enough? All questions that “Impression Share (IS)” metrics in Google AdWords can help answer for advertisers. Google’s “Analyse Competition” tool shows competitive insights, but IS metrics are perhaps a little more accurate to gauge performance against your competitors in a Google AdWords auction (showing an ad, an impression). Impression Share is calculated by the number of impressions received, divided by the estimated number of impressions you could have received – based on your targeting settings (keywords, locations, languages etc), approval statuses, bids and Quality Scores – Google says Impression Share changes are coming!

Originally you only had four IS columns, namely: IS, Lost IS (budget), Lost IS (Rank), Exact Match IS. You’ll notice historical data is no longer available before October 2012, this is to enable the new IS column transition, all new data will go as far back as 1 October 2012. The changes below are set to arrive immediately for some advertisers or by February 2013 for everyone!

What are the Changes?

  1. Distinct Search and Display Columns. New columns separating Search and Display IS.
  2. “Hour of Day” Segmentation. Evaluate ad coverage by segmented time “Dimensions”.
  3. Filters, Charts and Rules. Apply filters, automated rules and graphs using IS metrics.
  4. Accuracy. Improvements to the calculation of IS.

The new columns are simply Search and Display variations for each original column, as above – Now here’s a question: Can you tell us why there’s no Exact Match IS for Display? comment and WIN a massive, virtual high-five!

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YouTube TrueView Ads [Study]

YouTube TrueView video ads offer a pricing model that is based on user engagement, only paying for interested viewers. This creates a win-win scenario for both advertiser and YouTube user. Impressions are free, just the same as a Pay Per Click model, advertisers are only charged when a users selects to watch a video ad, or watches the pre roll ad for more than 30 seconds or to the end of the video, whichever comes first. Guarantee that your budget is spent on an interested audience.

Google recently announced that TrueView ads are now available on mobile devices, but why is this significant? Lets take a quick look at some mobile YouTube stats from last year: more than 20% of global YouTube views came from mobile devices, YouTube is available on over 350 million mobile devices and roughly 3 hours of video was uploaded to YouTube per minute from a mobile device. The basic notion is that mobile traffic on YouTube was never monetised before and now allows advertisers to further expand campaigns across multiple screens; increasing reach, recall and conversions. AdWords for Video means that advertising campaigns across Google networks can all be managed in one interface, bringing YouTube and Google AdWords advertising together.

Mobile In-Stream TrueView Ad – source

Study: How do people respond to TrueView Ads?

Some of you may know that there are four types of TrueView ads, but if I mention the pre roll ad that plays before your video, you probably know exactly what I am referring to and I’d probably be correct in assuming you hate those ads, yes? Interestingly, a study done by Google in the US with a sample size of 1600+ people shows different:

  • Only 10% of people will always skip these ads.
  • 8/10 viewers prefer TrueView ads to standard in-stream YouTube ads.
  • 8/10 thought the “Skip” button was clear, which means people don’t have to think too hard, they know they can skip.
  • 9/10 viewers thought TrueView ads create a better video viewing environment.
  • Curiosity is the main reason users choose to watch an ad, therefore sparking interest in the first 5 seconds (before they skip) is key to driving viewership.
  • Viewers are likely to skip ads they have seen before, which is good for not wasting ad budget.

Find the above study, here.

Based on these findings and the results we have experienced with TrueView ads, they are certainly NOT hated by all and can be very effective. The same targeting is available on YouTube as with the Google Display Network, remarketing lists can be created from YouTube ads and we’re able to set a frequency cap, which limits the amount of times the same person will see an ad per day. These ads lead to follow-on views which increases overall view counts and keeps people engaged with your brand, or as Google says, “buy one, get one free”. We can also direct interested viewers to a desired landing page from a ‘call to action’ banner that is overlayed within the advertised video, great for direct response campaigns and these clicks are at no extra cost to the video view. So, if you have video content that you’d like to promote, try YouTube TrueView Ads or give us a shout.

Recent Changes to Remarketing

Remarketing is a very useful AdWords tool for targeting users who have already been your site but did not complete the desired action (eg. A newsletter sign up or a product purchase). There are various methods for using Remarketing to work for your campaign objectives. Please see my previous post on the basics of Remarketing.

Earlier this month, Google made some changes to how marketers are able to use this feature. The first change allows for Remarketing lists to be created and managed within Google Analytics, allowing for deeper analysis of these ads. This can be found in the Admin section under “Remarketing Lists”.

The second change is the ability to create various Remarketing lists using one piece of code instead of many.
Before, if you wanted to separate ad messages according to the page category that the user was browsing before they left the site, a unique code for each of those categories would have to be generated and implemented within the corresponding webpage. For example, if you have a site selling shoes, you would have to have a unique code for running shoes, a unique code for boots etc., in order to be able to deliver Remarketing ads specific to those shoe types.

Now, only one Remarketing code needs to be generated and implemented across all pages of the site. Some accounts may already have this code automatically generated. If you have this, it will be found under the “Audiences” tab, within the shared library, named “Main List”. If your account does not have this pre-generated list, then click ‘New audience’. Select ‘Remarketing list’ and then ‘define a list of site visitors by placing a new tag on selected pages’. Select the ‘+New tag’ button, name your remarketing list as ‘Main List’.

When the code of this Main List has been implemented across the site, you will then be ready to create category-based lists. From the Audiences tab, select ‘New audience’ > ‘Remarketing List’. Then select ‘Define a list of site visitors based on the selection below’. You can then create a list defined by the contents of the URL. For example, if you want to create a list for all users who viewed running shoes on your site, you would select all URL’s containing the term “runningshoes”. This method is therefore dependant on the URL structure of your site.

If you have already been using Remarketing, you can continue to use the old method, but some changes will need to be made in order to be able to use this new feature. See an explanation from Google on these changes here.

This new way of Remarketing has the obvious benefit of not having to deal with too many separate pieces of code, which can get especially complex when emailing to clients with explanations on implementation. It is also a time saver in that you would no longer need to keep adding additional code when there are changes to landing pages and promoted products.

Image source.

 

TrueView Video Ads Bring AdWords and YouTube Together

In the attempt to get more small and medium AdWords advertisers to try video and to simultaneously expand and improve the targeting options on YouTube and the Google Display Network (GDN), Google video ad formats and targeting options have received a significant update.

The first big change is that most of these video ads will no longer be charged for per click, but per view. A view counts as either a full watch of the video, or, in the case that it is longer than thirty seconds, a view of the first thirty seconds of the video. This will clearly make the video ad formats more lucrative for advertisers, as they will only be charged for potentially interested viewers. Users who skip their ads won’t leave a dent in the advertisers’ marketing budgets. Video ads will now also receive a sort of “quality score” similar to search ads that can, for instance, determine their position on the YouTube search results page along with the bid. This also adds a dimension of ‘engagement’ to the video ad model. Google thinks advertisers will aim for shorter, high quality clips more than ever to assure good scores, which would also be a definite win for the users.

The second big change is that you can manage all this from within AdWords now. You will also get additional metrics (such as view rate, thumb impressions and video impressions) and will be able to search for your YouTube videos from the AdWords interface to easily upload them. First and foremost, however, you will have access to AdWords’ highly sophisticated targeting methods. You can now target users by audiences consisting of interest categories, topics, content keywords or YouTube search keywords, for instance. This should make video advertising much more efficient.

The four ad formats promoted as “TrueView” video ads are as follows:

  • In-search (previously known as promoted videos, showing on the YouTube SERP and targeting YouTube search keywords)
  • In-stream (videos that show within a video – mostly up front, but can also be shown in the middle or at the end – and that can be skipped after five seconds)
  • In-slate (this is a new format where users will be shown a selection of three videos, and can choose the one they want to watch before proceeding to the actual video they came for – this will be more “opt-in” than in-stream ads, as the user is given a choice, however note that with this format the advertiser will already be charged for the click of the video)
  • In-display (these ads can show on YouTube or the GDN – for instance as a promotion on the right hand side of a YouTube video that is currently being watched)

Thinking about getting your advertising YouTube-ready? Remember that rich-media ads are becoming more important and effective than static banners in many cases and that YouTube is in fact the second largest search engine in the world. Two good reasons to give these new formats a try! Visit http://www.youtube.com/advertise/trueview.html for more!

Think with Google: Insights and Statistics on 2010 Learnings

Statistics from the above video:

  • 89% of consumers started their holiday shopping online.
  • Portable PC shoppers do an average of 14 searches during their shopping process.
  • Consumers exposed to Home Page adverts on YouTube are 4 times more likely to: visit the advertisers website, search for the brand or watch the companies YouTube videos.
  • ±60% of moms search for coupons or special offers.
  • For every 10 application searches driven online, search drives another 4.5 offline (financial advertisers).
  • Over 70% of TV, movies and gaming fans visit sites on the Google Display Network everyday.
  • Google Display Network reaches more vehicle buyers than any other portal.
  • 25% of auto purchasers utilise mobile web while researching their new vehicle.
  • 75% of patients research their symptoms online before discussing them with their doctors.
  • 40% of travelers search for consumer reviews before booking their next trip.

Inside AdWords Blog:
http://adwords.blogspot.com/2011/02/think-with-google-what-we-learned-in.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed:+blogspot/ATHs+(Inside+AdWords)